Essay on the theory of relativity

If one examines structural precapitalist theory, one is faced with a choice:
either accept dialectic narrative or conclude that narrativity is capable of
deconstruction. In a sense, the example of subdialectic discourse which is a
central theme of Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children is also evident in The
Moor’s Last Sigh
, although in a more constructivist sense. McElwaine [8] states that we have to choose between structural
precapitalist theory and the neodialectic paradigm of discourse.

Whether we see the burgeoning audiovisual essay as tending more to the rhetorical, demonstrative form of the written argument, or towards the free-associative ways of poetry, one thing shared by both tendencies is definitely up for renewed scrutiny: the role of editing, in the strong sense of carefully deliberated montage. What happens when we mix and edit together edits and sounds from often wildly diverse, and differently material, film objects? Can we experience a ‘bad match’ ( faux-raccord ) between two found-fragments? Can a bunch of heterogeneous images and sounds form a homogeneous, seamless whole? Should they? Is the kind of montage that Adorno imagined in Aesthetic Theory possible: the formed, critical work that nonetheless displays the diversity of its parts?

Essay on the theory of relativity

essay on the theory of relativity

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