Ferdinand magellan research paper

There has been considerable debate around who were the first persons to circumnavigate the globe. The easy answer is Juan Sabastian Elcano and the remaining crew of Magellan’s fleet starting from Spain on September 20, 1519, and returning in September 1522. But there is another candidate who might have gone around the world before them—Magellan’ servant Enrique. In 1511, Magellan was on a voyage for Portugal to the Spice Islands and participated in the conquest of Malacca where he acquired his servant Enrique. Fast forward ten years later, Enrique is with Magellan in the Philippines. After Magellan’s death, it is reported that Enrique was grief stricken and when he found out he was not going to be freed, contrary to Magellan’s will, he ran away. At this point the record gets murky. Some accounts state Enrique fled into the forest. Official Spanish records list Enrique as one of the men massacred in the attack, but some historians question the records’ credibility or accuracy, citing a bias against native people.

Rajah Humabon of Cebu was friendly towards Magellan and the Spaniards; both he and his queen Hara Amihan were baptized as Christians and were given the image of the Holy Child (later known as Santo Niño de Cebu ) which along with a cross ( Magellan's Cross ) symbolizes the Christianization of the Philippines. Afterward, Rajah Humabon and his ally Datu Zula convinced Magellan to kill their enemy, Datu Lapu-Lapu , on Mactan. Magellan wanted to convert Lapu-Lapu to Christianity, as he had Humabon, but Lapu-Lapu rejected that. On the morning of 27 April 1521, Magellan sailed to Mactan with a small attack force. During the resulting battle against Lapu-Lapu's troops, Magellan was struck by a bamboo spear, and later surrounded and finished off with other weapons. [30]

This is an English translation (with facsimile volume) of a French version of Pigafetta’s lost original journal, Relazione del primo viaggio intorno al mondo (Relation on the First Voyage around the World), dated about 1525 and now owned by Yale University. There are three other surviving “copies”—two in French, one in Italian—and their provenance and relationships are described in great detail here in Skelton’s work. The Yale manuscript is considered the finest copy, clearly intended for presentation to a nobleman; it is also the most complete of the three French copies. Purchasing it from an English dealer’s catalogue in 1953, Edwin J. Beinecke presented it to Yale’s Beinecke Library in 1964. It consists of 103 leaves of vellum (97 bearing text or maps), with text written in a clear, careful humanistic script, twenty-seven lines to the page, and with illuminated initials and paragraph marks. The manuscript is divided into forty-eight chapters, each preceded by a summary. There are numerous marginal captions and twenty-three maps interspersed through the text.

The remaining three ships reached the Pacific, but there were no navigational charts of the entire ocean. Magellan assumed the ocean was rather small, and predicted that the journey to the Spice Islands would take little more than a week. After three months, the crew reached the island of Guam . Without the food stores that were aboard the San Antonio , the remaining sailors lived off of rats, hard tack, sawdust, and any fish they could catch. Magellan anchored in Guam for several weeks to let his beleaguered crew recover. The crew then continued on to the Philippines . There, Magellan established good relations with the local king, but he and his men became involved in a tribal dispute. Several men were wounded and killed in the fighting, including Magellan. He died on April 27, 1521.

Ferdinand magellan research paper

ferdinand magellan research paper

The remaining three ships reached the Pacific, but there were no navigational charts of the entire ocean. Magellan assumed the ocean was rather small, and predicted that the journey to the Spice Islands would take little more than a week. After three months, the crew reached the island of Guam . Without the food stores that were aboard the San Antonio , the remaining sailors lived off of rats, hard tack, sawdust, and any fish they could catch. Magellan anchored in Guam for several weeks to let his beleaguered crew recover. The crew then continued on to the Philippines . There, Magellan established good relations with the local king, but he and his men became involved in a tribal dispute. Several men were wounded and killed in the fighting, including Magellan. He died on April 27, 1521.

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