Propasal writing

This Guide for Writing a Funding Proposal was created to help empower people to be successful in gaining funds for projects that provide worthwhile social service. A major theme that runs throughout the Guide is a concern for the development of meaningful cooperative relationships - with funding agencies, with community organizations, and with the people you are serving - as a basis for the development of strong fundable initiatives. The Guide is built on the assumption that it is through collaboration and participation at all levels that long term change can be effected. To make this Guide as useful as possible, all suggestions have been carefully reviewed with a concern that they be easy to implement and can have the greatest positive effect on the creation of a funding proposal. (This is the same design concern that I used for the creation of the companion guide for graduate students - Guide for Writing and Presenting Your Thesis or Dissertation ). Long orations are minimized and suggestions are presented in a direct and clear manner. Actual proposal examples are included so that you can easily see the different suggestions demonstrated. As you are going through this Guide you will probably see things that aren't clear, need fixing, or should be further clarified. Please send them along and I will do my best to improve the Guide based upon your ideas. I try to make major revisions in the Guide at least 2-3 times each year. Your suggestions on how to improve this Guide will be most appreciated

And finally, I receive many requests asking me to recommend a book or two that would be helpful in writing a good proposal. I've started to create such a listing of books I've identified and my review of each of them. Feel free to check out my selection of books to help with the preparation of a funding proposal . Enjoy using this Guide and I hope it brings you good luck as you seek funding for your ideas!

Joe Levine ([email protected])


Proposal Section

Sponsors would usually provide money for both psychological and logical reasons. Proposal psychologics tend to the emotional needs of the sponsor. The components that can be found in a successful proposal include passion, ownership, energy, trust, and commitment. Sponsors use grants as investments. Sponsors need to feel that you are serious about helping them with their problems. One example can be a proposal to a federal agency and a private college that describes its long history of achievement by working with community partners, controlling national programs that helps the intended population, and institutionalizing project activities. The project partners have worked with grant related initiatives which includes a six-year joint teacher education program among the Midwestern Regional College and the College of Native Americans. The ideas the project director has for Native American middle school kids includes Achievement in Math, Math and Science Immersion and Kids Math Camp. [12] As long as a proposal expresses interest and concern for the values and ideal of the sponsor, there is a good chance for success. [12]

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Propasal writing

propasal writing

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